sábado, 19 de agosto de 2017

Jaimeo Brown Transcendence - Work Songs 2016

Jaimeo Brown Transcendence is the project of New York-based drummer/composer Jaimeo Brown and guitarist/producer Chris Sholar. The concept of their collaboration blends early recordings of blues, jazz, and folk songs with live hip-hop, jazz, and electronic elements. The duo first began this approach on the 2013 album Transcendence, which was credited to Brown, but launched their unique collaboration by using African-American spirituals, East Indian music, and other rare samples within a newly formed context. Brown and Sholar returned in early 2016 with their first proper release under the Jaimeo Brown Transcendence banner. Work Songs, released on the Motéma label, continued to sample and reassemble rare recordings and also featured contributions from saxophonists Jaleel Shaw and J.D. Allen, soul singer Lester Chambers, and more. AMG.

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Kevin Ayers - Banana Productions The Best of Kevin Ayers 2000

The Best of Kevin Ayers covers his most lucrative years as a solo artist, from his debut album, 1969's Joy of a Toy, up to 1978's Rainbow Takeaway. While there are plenty of inessentials within such a span, this collection does an excellent job at compiling the most appealing cuts from Ayers' first eight albums, excluding his June 1, 1974 release with Brian Eno, John Cale, and Nico. A firm representation of Ayers' non-conformist style, peculiar wit, and outright silliness is contained within each track, beginning as early as 1970's "Singing a Song in the Morning" backed by the Canterbury sound of Caravan. "Soon Soon Soon," taken from 1976's Odd Ditties, a mix of A- and B-sides, has Soft Machine's Mike Ratelidge helping out, while "There Is Loving/Among Us/There Is Loving," from Whatevershebringswesing, displays his adeptness at creating a colorful persona through his music, aided by David Bedford's instrumental guidance. "Rheinhardt & Geraldine" from Shooting at the Moon combines a chiming melody with solid pop essence, and the haunting "Irreversible Neural Damage" is the best track from the otherwise humdrum Dr. Dream album. "Song From the Bottom of a Well" puts Ayers' rumbling, marble-mouthed growl in between the screech of the accompanying guitar riffs, while "Hat Song" and "Ballad of a Salesman Who Sold Himself" are his best late-'70s efforts. Kevin Ayers' work with Soft Machine wonderfully rubs off throughout his solo material, especially by way of the innovative musical style he employs and the inventiveness that erupts from the instruments, but it's his special brand of aloof candor and vocal detail that really gives his music an added bite. This cheerful skip through some of Ayers' best material will most likely spark an interest in his back catalog for those who haven't discovered him fully. AMG.

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Amir Elsaffar - Alchemy 2013

Trumpet/composer Amir ElSaffar is a classically trained musician who explores both jazz and traditional Iraqi maqam music. Born in Chicago, IL, in 1977 to an Iraqi father and American mother, ElSaffar grew up listening to an eclectic mix of music that ultimately led to his studying classical music at DePaul University. Having developed an avid interest in jazz, ElSaffar competed in and won the 2001 Carmine Caruso Jazz Trumpet Competition and the 2001 International Trumpet Guild Jazz Improvisation Competition. A year later, a trip to Baghdad brought ElSaffar into contact with masters of the traditional Iraqi maqam style of music as well as the santoor -- a type of hammered dulcimer -- which he learned how to play. Leaving Iraq before the war began in 2003, ElSaffar began incorporating Iraqi music into his jazz trumpet playing and jazz compositions. He released his debut album, Two Rivers, on Pi Recordings in 2007. ElSaffar returned with his long suite Inana in 2011 using the Two Rivers ensemble, which brought everyone but Rudresh Mahanthappa back. He was replaced by tenor saxophopnist Olie Mathisen. AMG.

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Abdullah Ibrahim - Senzo 2009

Abdullah Ibrahim's followers likely have preferences for his big-band, large-ensemble, trio, or solo works, but any of his fans will agree that all of his projects display a unique melodic touch that is immediately recognizable and pleasant. Well into his golden years, Ibrahim still proves he has the Midas touch on this collection of 22 solo acoustic piano pieces. It's a mix of familiar songs and new material, all referencing the elements of life, nature, hearth, and homeland that have always been central themes in what he calls storytelling, not mere music-making. On this triptych through memorable experiences, the pianist weaves his way through many short snippets of phrases that have served him well, and a few extended discourses that define his career and its struggles to come out triumphant.
There's an ebb and flow to the program that makes you want to listen all the way through, but certain familiar signposts along the way remind you how distinctive and singularly unique Ibrahim's style is. From hymnal and reverent to bouncy South African township music, the blues, Duke Ellington, and back to nature, he continues to reinvent his music with a timeless quality that lingers and never leaves the back of your mind. Then again, there's a serenity and peaceful quality always present, as heard in versions of "Ocean & the River" that bookend the CD, the similarly thematic "In the Evening," the cool "Aspen," the meditative "Prelude" to "For Coltrane," and the soulful "Mamma." Ellington's influence has been with Ibrahim since he was discovered by the jazz legend, and he always acknowledges it, here with the patient revisited version of "Blues for a Hip King" and an unusual extrapolated take of "In a Sentimental Mood." Back to his South African roots, "Tookah" is a short look back at youth, "Pula" a musical homage to rain showers, and "Jabulani" another remade original and expression of joy (this time much faster), while the very familiar "Banyana, Children of Africa" is a definitive, familiar, and rambling tune so identifiable with Ibrahim and Ibrahim alone. He pays tribute to wife Sathima on "Blues for Bea," which assimilates the stride piano sound as well as anything he's ever done, and "Nisa" and "Senzo" back to back are a spiritual pairing, painting aural images of moonlight on water and a somber, pensive, post-romantic mood. Always within his capabilities, playing lovely jazz improvisations embedded deep in his soul, Abdullah Ibrahim makes another classic and epic statement, worthy of high praise and recommended to sensitive and warm-hearted people everywhere. AMG.

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Paulo César Pinheiro - Capoeira de Besouro 2010

One of the best poets of Musica Popular Brasileira, Paulo César Pinheiro wrote over 1,500 songs with more than 100 different partners. Over 700 of his songs have been recorded and re-recorded, adding up to 900 discographical registers by over 120 interpreters, in almost 300 different records. Not being a musician, Pinheiro nevertheless wrote complete songs with music and lyrics, such as "Alento" (recorded by Paulinho da Viola), "Samba da Ilusão" (recorded by Cristina Buarque), "Meu Castigo," "Ninguém," and "Rolou" (recorded by Clara Nunes), among others.
Pinheiro is the poet of loneliness, of eternal passion and of failed love affairs; in his poetry, samba and death meet each other. From the generation of the '60s, he started to write poetry at 13 and, in 1964, he wrote the classic "Viagem" with João de Aquino, which was his first song. In 1965, Pinheiro started a prolific partnership with Baden Powell, with "Lapinha" (which won the I Bienal do Samba festival of TV Record, in 1968, having been recorded in this same year by Elis Regina). Through Powell, he met (and composed with) PixinguinhaRadamés GnattaliAlcyr Pires VermelhoMirabeau, and Ribamar.
"A Grande Ausente" (written with Francis Hime) was presented by Taiguara at the III Festival da Música Popular Brasileira (Festival of Brazilian Popular Music, TV Record, 1968) and got sixth place. Pinheiroalso had his "Anunciação" (written with Francis Hime) interpreted in that year by MPB-4 at the III Festival Internacional da Canção (International Song Festival, TV Globo). In 1970, he had a short season in Paris, France, with Baden Powell. Returning to Brazil, he participated in the soundtrack of the film A Vingança dos Doze (Marcos Farias), having also had 12 of his songs included in the soundtrack of the TV Globo soap opera O Semideus. In the same year, Elis Regina recorded his "Samba do Perdão," "Quaquaraquaquá," and "Aviso Aos Navegantes" (all written with Powell), while Elizeth Cardosorecorded "Refém da Solidão" (also written with Powell). In 1971, Pinheiro won the IV Festival Universitário da Música Popular (University Festival of Popular Music, TV Tupi) with "E Lá Se Vão Meus Anéis" (written with Eduardo Gudin), interpreted by the Os Originais do Samba; and "Diálogo" (written with Baden Powell) won a festival in Spain in the next year. In 1973, he participated in the soundtrack of the film Tati, a Garota (Bruno Barreto), and had his "Agora é Portela 74" (written with Maurício Tapajós) recorded by MPB-4.
The first LP recorded by Pinheiro as the interpreter of his own compositions was Paulo César Pinheiro, which had "Maior é Deus" (written with Eduardo Gudin), "Viagem" (written with João de Aquino), "Cicatrizes" (written with Miltinho), and others. In 1975-1976, he participated, with Márcia and Eduardo Gudin, in the historic show O Importante É Que A Nossa Emoção Sobreviva, which was recorded live and released as a LP. In 1978, Pinheiro wrote the soundtrack to the film A Batalha dos Guararapes (Paulo Thiago) and participated in the soundtrack of the highly popular TV Globo children's series Sítio do Pica-Pau Amarelo with "Pedrinho e Jabuticaba" (written with Dori Caymmi); having also written, with Edu Lobo, songs for the other children's TV show Rá-Tim-Bum (TV Cultura). In the '80s, Pinheirorecorded other LPs as an interpreter, having also released another poetry book (after Canto Brasileiro, 1976). In 1994, he had nationwide visibility with the praised live recorded show with João Nogueira, Parcerias. Two years later, another success: this time with the show Tudo o Que Mais Nos Uniu, with Márcia and Eduardo Gudin, a commemoration of the 20 years of the first spectacle performed by the trio. AMG.

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Camel - Stationary Traveller 1984

Although Stationary Traveller is a concept album, it musically falls into line with its predecessor The Single Factor, which found Camel trying to refashion themselves as the Alan Parsons Project. Where The Single Factor suffered from Camel's attempts to write pop hooks, Stationary Traveller finds the band breaking down the barriers, opening up their relatively concise songs with long, atmospheric instrumental passages. The album's lyrics, which were written by Susan Hoover, is about the divided Berlin and its political, emotional and physical divides. Often, the lyrics and music -- which work as individual entities -- don't quite work together, since they follow different emotional directions, yet the record remains a worthwhile listen, especially since it features Andy Latimer on pan flute. AMG.

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R.L. Burnside - Rollin & Tumblin (The King of the Hill Country Blues) 2010

R.L. Burnside, along with Junior Kimbrough, became the public face of the so-called North Mississippi hill country style of modal blues in the 1980s with several solid albums on the Fat Possum label, and while he tried on different hats during his run (even tracking a fine album backed by indie rocker Jon Spencer and his band), the blues he made essentially stayed in the same pocket, honed from years of playing weekend house parties and juke joints. His droning style, the style that all of the North Mississippi players used, was equal parts John Lee Hooker and Fred McDowell, designed to keep the beat steady for dancing and allowing minimal but effective interplay between voice and guitar, and it was as old as those hills themselves, somehow sounding both ancient and oddly contemporary all at once. This set, drawn from intimate recordings done in 1975, 1989, and 1991, features Burnside playing mostly solo -- both acoustic and electric -- in living rooms, on porches, and in jukes, and it provides a nicely sequenced portrait of this intriguing musician working away from a studio setting, not that what he did in the studios differed one degree from what he did outside of them. Highlights include two takes of “Long Haired Doney,” three of the signature “Poor Black Mattie” (both acoustic and electric), an endearing and intimate version of “Goin’ Down South,” and a solid take on Hooker's “Boogie Chillen” that shows how large a role Hooker played in the creation of the hill country sound and style. AMG.

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Abdullah Ibrahim - South African Ambassador 1997

Abdullah Ibrahim (born Adolph Johannes Brand on 9 October 1934 and formerly known as Dollar Brand) is a South African pianist and composer. His music reflects many of the musical influences of his childhood in the multicultural port areas of Cape Town, ranging from traditional African songs to the gospel of the AME Church and ragas, to more modern jazz and other Western styles. Ibrahim is considered the leading figure in the subgenre of Cape jazz. Within jazz, his music particularly reflects the influence of Thelonious Monk and Duke Ellington. He is known especially for "Mannenberg", a jazz piece that became a notable anti-apartheid anthem. With his wife, the jazz singer Sathima Bea Benjamin, he is father to the New York underground rapper Jean Grae, as well as to a son, Tsakwe.

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segunda-feira, 31 de julho de 2017

The Phoenix Foundation - Buffalo 2010

The drowsy/easy psych-drone-pop amble of "Eventually" starts the Phoenix Foundation's 2010 full-length album on an agreeably understated pace, as good a way to set a tone as a full-on blast might be. The main guitar line, a little Feelies and a little post-punk epic art, mixed with a bit of classic rock imagery thanks to the lyrics, finds a kind of happy blend that the band has worked to make its own. The similar sense of gentle fusion and picking among the ruins of the past crops up throughout Buffalo -- the polite Velvets/pub rock chug of "Flock of Hearts" shaped by some sweet chimes and a bit of distant Mellotron/vocal chorusing along with a very glammy guitar break. Songs like "Skeleton" find a more direct hook/lyric approach, while the sweet uptempo pep of "Orange & Mango" shades into a swirling series of guitar loop breaks and shuddering keyboard surge. "Wonton" captures another sense of understated ease, almost breezy in feeling and sound. Samuel Flynn Scott's vocals often come across as nondescript but aim to be familiar rather than remarkable, suiting the sense of easy immediacy here -- the appeal of being what you expect. Then again, on "Pot" the chorale effect is higher pitched and warmly inviting, so a little twist can do nicely. Some fun lyrical touches abound: "All of these spots are being turned into gallery spaces" on "Bitte Bitte" leads into a nice little observation of the necessity of difference -- the line "Please don't be my friend" could almost be from an early Flying Nun band instead of a current one. "Golden Ship" ends the album on a nice full-bodied punch. AMG.

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Slow Poke - At Home 2007

Well-known indie jazz label Palmetto Records made its first foray into the digital only market with this raw and rootsy, blues influenced post-bop jam project by the N.Y.C. based avant-garde quartet. It's a safe project to create such an experiment with, a homemade session recorded back in 1998 at the Brooklyn home of group bassist Tony Scherr and later remastered in 2006. Despite the release of one official CD, Redemption in 2000, the group was, even years later, popular on more or less a grass roots level. Heavily influenced by singer/songwriters, Scherr, saxman and keyboardist Michael Blake, slide and baritone guitarist David Tronzo, and drummer Kenny Wollesen have a ball exploring the psychedelic blues-rock potential of Eddie Harris' "Listen Here" and reaping a slow, soulful "Harvest" from the Neil Young classic. Along the way, they're "Rockin' in Rhythm," bringing a blues jam sensibility to Duke Ellington, and dive into the hypnotic swamp on Kurt Wagner's "The Saturday Option." At Home also offers a glimpse at Blake's free-form compositional prowess on three originals, including the molasses paced "Dry Socket," which lets the listener know that this band is intent at times on living up to its name. AMG.

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Anders Osborne - Bury The Hatchet 2002

Swedish-born Anders Osborne has made the city of New Orleans his own, immersing himself in its idiosyncratic ways. Certainly one of the most unique subcultures in the city is that of the Mardi Gras Indians. Osborne has teamed up with one of the best-known Mardi Gras Indians of them all, Monk Boudreaux, to create this CD with its appropriate title of Bury the Hatchet. The songs on the album are a mixture of Mardi Gras Indian tunes and Osborne originals. The recording starts right in with Boudreaux announcing, "I Am the Big Chief," which, of course, he is. Formerly performing with longtime friend Bo Dollis and his Wild MagnoliasMonk Boudreaux is now chief of his own tribe, the Golden Eagles. The listener will hear songs from the street tradition, including the obligatory "Meet de Boys on de Battlefront," as well as "Dive in That Gumbo" and "Smoke It Right." The sonorous voice of Boudreaux is accompanied by fancy guitar and banjo work by Osborne, as well as some outstanding contributions by piano wizard David Torkanowsky and Kirk Joseph on the saxophone. The album also contains some folksier tunes by Osborne, such as the evocative "Summertime in New Orleans" and the pensive "Letters From Rome." The aggregation performs an interesting cover of Neil Young's "Ohio," as if to say that they know all is not right with the world. But they have not forgotten the party spirit for which the Crescent City is renowned. A rousing rendition of "Junco Partner" extols the virtues of excess in a way that would make Dr. John and James Booker proud. Fans of Anders Osborne will appreciate the lyrical qualities of their man on the CD. Perhaps the exposure will bring some new fans to the fantastic Mardi Gras Indian tradition that well deserves it. AMG.

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Willie Tee - Teasin' You 2002)

The list of great soul singers who never received the kind of fame and fortune commensurate with their extraordinary talent could fill a phone book, but even so, the obscurity heaped upon Willie Tee is a crime -- a graceful and fluid vocalist equally adept with poignant ballads and saucy deep soul, he assimilated the jazz traditions of his native New Orleans to forge a sophisticated sound completely distinct from his contemporaries. The title cut was Tee's biggest single if not necessarily his best, inaugurating the shuffling, Caribbean-inflected approach followed by much of his early material -- its B-side, "Walking Up a One-Way Street," is his masterpiece as much for its buoyant horn arrangement and stutter-step rhythm as for Tee's swooping, searing vocals. But just because he quickly fell off the charts doesn't mean the quality of his records fell off, too -- shifting easily from sweet ballads ("Dedicated to You") to Motown-esque pop ("Please Don't Go") to blistering funk ("Swivel Your Hips"), Tee mastered every idiom he tackled but just never clicked with listeners. Teasin' You seems mastered directly from vinyl, and in some cases it sounds as if the grooves were worn right off the original singles -- audiophiles should proceed with caution, but Night Train nevertheless deserves kudos simply for making these records available again. AMG.

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Chris Bell - Blues 2001 (2000)

Chris was born in Washington, DC, and raised in Massachusetts on down-home cooking as well as on blues, jazz, rhythm & blues, and gospel music by his New York City dad and North Carolina mom. Before starting to play guitar at fourteen years old, he studied in Germany, where his dad was a visiting professor of American and African American Cultural Studies. Later, as an art and music major at the University of Massachusetts, Chris participated in jazz workshops with Archie Shepp and in a summer session at Berklee. He also studied guitar with Tony MacAlpine. His major influences range from B.B. King and Albert Collins to Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughan. Songwriter, lead guitarist, and vocalist, Chris Bell, Silver Bridge Recording blues artist from North Hollywood, California, is now on tour featuring his latest CD release “Real Bluesman” with his band, 100% Blues. They have also just recently released their live concert DVD "Stage on Fire", filmed locally in Tujunga, CA. Chris and his band "100% Blues" features Chuck Maithonis on bass and backing vocals, Stephen "DJ Sticks" Marshall on drums, and Dan Pulos on Hammond Organ. They have been successfully touring the Western US, and regularly head out to the East Coast every summer. They have received rave reviews of their latest album "Real Bluesman" in such magazines as Blues Revue, Living Blues, Southland Blues, Big City Rhythm & Blues, and more. Jim Santos of Southland Blues Magazine wrote - "Bell comes up with a winner that will undoubtedly wind up among this year's top ten blues albums." Of his previous album - “ ‘Hell Is Too Hot For Me’ is easily the best original blues guitar album to inhabit my CD player this year,” writes the reviewer for the Centre Daily Times, “maybe the best blues album period.” Chris Bell’s earlier two CDs, “Blues 2001” and “CHRIS BELL & 100% Blues: LIVE” and his live performances of mostly original songs have received rave reviews. “Mixing up the mood with catchy lyrics and some dark lowdown blues,” says the reviewer for Southwest Blues, “Bell shows a flair for blues styles past and present.” “Bell played guitar dirtier than dirt,” the Southland Blues reviewer writes about Bell’s performance at the Irvine Lake Blues Festival. “His biggest and coolest trait is his grit and grimy voice that is so distinctive it’s in a class alone.” His single “Elevator to Heaven” was been among the top downloaded songs on MP3 in 1999. Chris is also currently the producer and host of "100% Blues," a cable access TV show in the Los Angeles area.

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Acoustic Syndicate - Rooftop Garden 2013

North Carolina's Acoustic Syndicate consists of vocalist/banjo player Bryon McMurry, vocalist/percussionist Fitz McMurry, vocalist/guitarist Steve McMurry, guitarist Roger Padgett, bassist Jay Sanders and flautist Gaines Post. The group formed in 1992 and released two albums regionally, including 1998's Tributaries; their self-titled album received national release in 1999. Their third release, Crazy Little Life, followed a year later. AMG.

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Joyce & Banda Maluca - Just A Little Bit Crazy 2003

This 2003 album by Brazilian bossa nova diva Joyce and her Banda Maluca is every bit as strong as her last outing for Far Out, Gafieira Moderna in 2001. Just a Little Bit Crazy takes the jazzier aspects of that album and mixes them up with some modern electronic keyboard work courtesy of the Norse keyboard whiz Bugge WesseltoftWesseltoft and drummer Tutty Moreno construct a series of spacy bossa and jazz soundscapes with gorgeous reed and woodwind work from Nailor Proveta and Teco Cardoso. The saxophones and flute work not so much as punchy accent devices or melodic constructs but as elements that float inside Joyce's well-constructed melodies.
They hover around her voice and fill space with lilting, drooping, sometimes floating lines when she is not singing. Joyce's guitar playing and the bass work of Rodolfo Stroeter are the absolute bedrock, or pillow cases, for this breezy, shimmering, summery bossa. But the deft improvisations Joyce works in vocally as well as the small-space ideas that come from the band are what make these 13 songs so revolutionary. This is pop music of the highest order, but it is also jazz vocalizing on a similar level. Take a listen to "Na Paz" or "Samba Do Joyce," her idiosyncratically beautiful version of the Beatles' "A Hard Day's Night," for examples. Joyce's singing is better than ever and her guitaristry is growing by leaps and bounds; she may be a master now, but she is also becoming a great innovator and stylist. On the spookily gorgeous "Tufão," Wesseltoft's keyboards create a quiet, swirling, sucking sound as a backdrop before Joyce's guitar, Moreno's cymbals, and Robertinho Silva's wispy, unobtrusive, constant percussion work enter just ahead of her voice in full plaintive moan. In the bridge, Wesseltoft on acoustic piano engages the horns, flute, and Joyce in a bit of harmonic interplay that adds layers to the already texturally rich palette. The melody moves from pastoral over to urban night song, from ballad to nearly midtempo jazz groover, and the emotion is one of serenity balanced by sadness. This is an amazing and very tender little album that offers further proof that the most creative and exciting music scene in the West is in Brazil. AMG.

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Kudsi Erguner - Ottomania 1999

Along with his brother, SuleymanKudsi Erguner is one of the top players of the ney, a Turkish reed flute. In addition to his own recordings, Erguner has performed with Peter GabrielMaurice BejartPeter BrookGeorges AperghisDidier Lockwood, and Michel Portal. His compositions and collaborations have been heard in the films The Last Temptation of Christ and Meetings with Remarkable Men, theater piece and film Mahabharata, and the ballets Le Voyage Nocturne and Neva. Erguner's band, the Kudsi Erguner Ensemble, was formed in 1988, as Fasi, with the goal of preserving the classical music of the 16th century Ottomon Empire. 
Erguner hails from a musical family. His father, Ulvi Erguner, and grandfather, Suleyman Erguner, were well-known players of the ney. In addition to what he learned from his father and grandfather, Erguner learned from the older musicians who often visited his childhood home. Erguner's knowledge of Turkish classical music was enhanced through his studies of the Sufi brotherhoods.
Launching his musical career in 1969 as a member of the Istanbul Radio Orchestra, Erguner moved to Paris six years later to study architecture and musicology.The following year, he worked on Peter Brook's movie Meetings with Remarkable Men, filmed on location in Afghanistan. Erguner later renewed his collaboration with Brook, composing and performing the score for a theater piece and film Mahabharata.
After conducting research in Turkey through a grant from UNESCO in 1980, Erguner returned to Paris and founded Mevlani, an institute for the study of the classical music and teachings of the Sufis. Between 1986 and 1987, Erguner spent lengthy periods in Pakistan recording and documenting traditional music for Radio France and France Musique. In late 1987, Erguner performed a concert of Ottoman music at the Royal Albert Hall in London. 
In 1988, Erguner collaborated with Peter Gabriel on the soundtrack of The Last Temptation of Christ. The same year, he recorded an album with his brother, The Mystic Flutes of Sufi, featuring preludes to ceremonies of the Whirling DervishesKudsi and Suleyman Ergenur renewed their partnership in 1990, releasing a second album together, Sufi Music of Turkey. The following year, Erguner released three albums -- Turquie: Musique Soufi with Ilahi and Nefes N. Uzel, Oriental Dreams with Mahmoud Tebrizizadeh, and, together with the Kudsi Erguner Ensemble, was one of several artists featured on Gazel: Classical Sufi Music of the Ottomon Empire. In 1997, Erguner joined with Derya Turkan to record Chemins. Two years later, he formed the Kudsi Erguner Sufi-Jazz Project, with Christof LauerMichel Godard, and Marc Nauseef, and recorded Ottomania. AMG.

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